Some Metrological Aspects of Measurements of Quantitative Characteristics During a Hypoxic Training of Elite Rowers

Hypoxic Training of Elite Rowers

Vihren Bachev, Lubomir Petrov, Albena Alexandrova, Svilen Neykov, Stefan Kolimechkov & Velizar Mihaylov

 

How to cite:
Bachev, V., Petrov, L., Alexandrova, A., Neykov, S., Kolimechkov, S. and Mihaylov, V. (2019). Some metrological aspects of measurements of quantitative characteristics during a hypoxic training of elite rowers, XXIX International Scientific Symposium 'Metrology and Metrology Assurance' (MMA) 2019 (pp. 150-153). Sozopol, Bulgaria. doi: 10.1109/MMA.2019.8935990.

International Scientific Symposium 'Metrology and Metrology Assurance'

Proceeding Book of the XXIX International Scientific Symposium 'Metrology and Metrology Assurance' 2019

Bulgaria Bulgaria, Sozopol
website: www.metrology-bg.org

ABOUT THE PROCEEDING BOOK

This is the Proceeding Book of the 29th International Scientific Symposium 'Metrology and Metrology Assurance' 2019, and it contains full-length articles from the Symposium. This book was published by the IEEE.

ABOUT THIS ARTICLE

This article presents our study on quantitative characteristics during a hypoxic training of professional rowers. The aim of our research was to ascertain the effectiveness of a complex model of experimental procedures and metrological support in the natural conditions of altitude training for elite rowers. Our study was originally presented by Prof. Bachev in the parallel sessions of the 29th International Scientific Symposium 'Metrology and Metrology Assurance' (click here for more information about the presentation) in Sozopol on 8 September 2019. Our article was reviewed by the International Programme Committee and published in the proceeding book of the Symposium, and it is now available for reading on this page.

 

Some metrological aspects of measurements of quantitative characteristics during a hypoxic training of elite rowers

Published Article in Conference Proceedings

Proceeding Book of the XXIX International Scientific Symposium 'Metrology and Metrology Assurance' 2019
Proceeding Book of the
XXIX International Scientific Symposium 'Metrology and Metrology Assurance' 2019

September 2019, pp. 150-153, ISBN (print): 978-1-7281-2214-4; ISBN (online): 978-1-7281-2213-7; DOI: 10.1109/MMA.2019.8935990

SOME METROLOGICAL ASPECTS OF MEASUREMENTS OF QUANTITATIVE CHARACTERISTICS DURING A HYPOXIC TRAINING OF ELITE ROWERS

Vihren Bachev, Lubomir Petrov, Albena Alexandrova, Svilen Neykov, Stefan Kolimechkov & Velizar Mihaylov
National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria
STK Sport, London, United Kingdom

ABSTRACT

The experimental research on the effects of the training model “living high, training high” would demand metrological support for the equipment and procedures required to measure three groups of indicators: training intensity, changes in the biological indicators, and degree of hypoxia. Sixteen athletes from the men’s Bulgarian national rowing team, with an average age of 18.7 years, took part in this study. They completed a three-week training camp at 2100 m above sea level at the Belmeken National Sports Base. Seven days before (T1), at the end (T2), and on the 7th (T3) and 18th day (T4) after the training camp each participant performed an incremental test – 4 stages x 40W apart x 3min with 30sec rest periods on a rowing ergometer. Before the tests, venous blood samples were obtained for analysis of: hemoglobin concentration (Hb), red blood cells count (RBC), hematocrit (Hct), reticulocytes (Ret‰), white blood cells (WBC), platelets (Plt), iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and total plasma protein (PP). The Hb increased significantly with 8.5 g/L, as well as Hct with 0.03 and RBC with 0.39 T/L at the end of the highaltitude training camp (T2). In addition, the Hb-independent parameters PP and Plt also increased significantly in T2. However, one week after training camp (T3), all of these parameters returned to their initial levels and remained unchanged even one week later (T4). We described an equation for resolving the metrological problem with the measurement of real hemoglobin changes during the “living high, training high” training model.

Key Words: hemoglobin, high altitude, hypoxia, training, rowing

 

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Full Text: Some metrological aspects of measurements of quantitative characteristics during a hypoxic training of elite rowers. Proceeding Book of the MMA Symposium 2019

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Authors

Professor Vihren Bachev DSc
Department of Theory and Methods of Sports Training, National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria

Associate Professor Dr Lubomir Petrov PhD
Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria Academia.edu | ORCID | Research Gate | Google Scholar

Associate Professor Albena Alexandrova PhD
Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria
Academia.edu | ORCID | Research Gate | Google Scholar

Professor Svilen Neykov PhD
Department of Theory and Methods of Sports Training, National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria

Stefan Kolimechkov PhD
Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria
Academia.edu | ORCID | Research Gate | Google Scholar
Corresponding author: dr.stefan.kolimechkov@gmail.com

Associate Professor Velizar Mihaylov PhD
Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria

 

DOI: 10.1109/MMA.2019.8935990

How to cite this article:
Bachev, V., Petrov, L., Alexandrova, A., Neykov, S., Kolimechkov, S. and Mihaylov, V. (2019). Some metrological aspects of measurements of quantitative characteristics during a hypoxic training of elite rowers, XXIX International Scientific Symposium 'Metrology and Metrology Assurance' (MMA) 2019 (pp. 150-153). Sozopol, Bulgaria. doi: 10.1109/MMA.2019.8935990.